Read George II: King and Elector by Andrew C. Thompson Online

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Despite a long and eventful reign, Britain's George II is a largely forgotten monarch, his achievements overlooked and his abilities misunderstood. This landmark biography uncovers extensive new evidence in British and German archives, making possible the most complete and accurate assessment of this thirty-three-year reign. Andrew C. Thompson paints a richly detailed portDespite a long and eventful reign, Britain's George II is a largely forgotten monarch, his achievements overlooked and his abilities misunderstood. This landmark biography uncovers extensive new evidence in British and German archives, making possible the most complete and accurate assessment of this thirty-three-year reign. Andrew C. Thompson paints a richly detailed portrait of the many-faceted monarch in his public as well as his private life.Born in Hanover in 1683, George Augustus first came to London in 1714 as the new Prince of Wales. He assumed the throne in 1727, held it until his death in 1760, and has the distinction of being Britain's last foreign-born king and the last king to lead an army in battle. With George's story at its heart, the book reconstructs his thoughts and actions through a careful reading of the letters and papers of those around him. Thompson explores the previously underappreciated roles George played in the political processes of Britain, especially in foreign policy, and also charts the intricacies of the king's complicated relationships and reassesses the lasting impact of his frequent return trips to Hanover. George II emerges from these pages as an independent and cosmopolitan figure of undeniable historical fascination....

Title : George II: King and Elector
Author :
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ISBN : 9780300118926
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 315 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

George II: King and Elector Reviews

  • Scott Jeffe
    2018-12-27 08:58

    George II. To paraphrase a vice presidential candidate "who was he, why was he written about?" Perhaps one of Britain's most forgotten kings, but he was one of the longest reigns in history (1727-1760) and as such had quite an impact on the course of that nation's history. Perhaps his greatest contribution was to the rise in supremacy of the "cabinet" and the "prime minister" over the king and his "closet" of unaccountable advisors. This rise can be attributed to the fact that George was both king of the United Kingdom AND Elector (ruling prince) of the German territory of Hanover. As such George had to divide his "Royal person" and try to make decisions for each place independently. He also had to divide his time. He spent part of almost 10 years in Hanover, and while his British ministers had to consult him on major decisions, there was also a lot that he had to empower them to do themselves. Some say that he emasculated the monarchy. I say "and so what?" The changes he brought about about probably were the foundations of today's strength of the monarchy. It has the right to be consulted, to warn, and to advise, but it does not rule. As such, while ministers very much had to curry favor with the king (because they wanted honors, titles, and sinecures that were in the Kings domain) they didn't have to agree to his every governmental whim. They made decisions because they held the "purse strings" but George held both the "fount of honor" and the international connections that "lubricated" relations with allies and enemies. All in all an interesting read, and one in which I learned quite a bit I didn't preciously know.

  • Laura Purcell
    2018-12-29 07:12

    An important study that makes some excellent points about the politics of the time. However, it is fairly dry to read and I would only recommend to the serious academic with some prior knowledge of George II.

  • Jacinta Hoare
    2018-12-28 01:18

    This took me quite a long time to read as this is rather a dry biography. However I did find George II's story interesting as he has never been a point on my historical interest radar to date.