Read The Witch of Bourbon Street by Suzanne Palmieri Online

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When Frances Sorrow returns home to the now dilapidated Sorrow Estate to restore her birthright, she finds herself haunted by a 100-year-old mystery only she can unravelSet amidst the charming chaos of The French Quarter and remote bayous of Tivoli Parish, Louisiana, Suzanne Palmieri’s The Witch of Bourbon Street weaves an unforgettable tale of mystery and magic.Situated dWhen Frances Sorrow returns home to the now dilapidated Sorrow Estate to restore her birthright, she finds herself haunted by a 100-year-old mystery only she can unravelSet amidst the charming chaos of The French Quarter and remote bayous of Tivoli Parish, Louisiana, Suzanne Palmieri’s The Witch of Bourbon Street weaves an unforgettable tale of mystery and magic.Situated deep in the bayou is the formerly opulent Sorrow Estate. Once home to a magical family, the Sorrows, it now lays in ruins, uninhabited since a series of murders in 1902 shocked the entire community. When Frances Green Sorrow is born, the family is on the brink of obscurity and the last remaining Sorrows cling to the hope that she is the one who will finally resurrect the glory of what once was.However, Frances has no wish to be the family’s savior. Disillusioned, she marries young, attempting an "ordinary life," and has a son, Jack. When her marriage fails and she loses custody of her boy, she runs away to live a quiet life on the dilapidated Sorrow Estate, where she practices solitary magic amid ghosts and gardens. But when Jack disappears, she is forced to rejoin the world she left behind and solve the century-old murder that casts a long shadow over Tivoli Parish and its inhabitants in order to find her son.The Witch of Bourbon Street is a story of love, family, redemption and forgiveness. It’s a story that bridges the nostalgia of time, and brings those that are separated back together again. ...

Title : The Witch of Bourbon Street
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781250056191
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 336 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Witch of Bourbon Street Reviews

  • Shelby *trains flying monkeys*
    2018-12-03 13:24

    I hate to admit defeat but I'm throwing in the towel at 68% of this book. I think if I keep going it's going to make me angry and I'll give it a really bad rating and it does have some beautiful passages so I'm just stopping and saying it wasn't for me. Frances Green Sorrow hasn't left the bayou in years. She cut off all contact with the outside world. Leaving her ex-husband and her son Jack. They still have contact with her but she just removed herself. I read some reviews that said the book got better after the first 150 pages so I kept trying but the story just never caught me in it's web. It jumps from person to person and I stayed lost. I'm sad because usually this is a story-line that I would love. Witches, bayou, the south. But what they always seem to forget is that true magic is born from sorrow. The only time we ever see clearly what we have is right before we're about to lose it for good.

  • Diane S ☔
    2018-11-27 15:36

    3.5 Yes, some of this novel was very predictable and yes, some of the lines were a bit corny but this was the prefect beach read. I mean you have the Sorrow Family, a family said to be witches and to have mysterious powers and then Bourbon Street and a crumbling down mansion with a mysterious past. On top of that you have a long past mystery of a whole family, at that mansion, that was found dead, a missing child, and a current family that is as strange as they are interesting. The past will affect the present in pressing ways and finally the truth of what happened cannot be denied. Loved every inch of this novel and could have read on. But like all good things it ended and so did my beach vacation.

  • Erica
    2018-12-12 15:32

    What the what?Why did I never review this? I read it MONTHS ago!Sorry. Sorry.Here is my review:I’ve been reading other reviews for this book and it seems those who love this lush and lovely tale are enthralled with the Southern charm, the generations of pain, the redemption, and, most especially, the lyrical nature of Suzanne’s writing. Those who don’t like it seem to feel it’s boring for the first half and confusing throughout, what with the narrative jumping back and forth between present day and the early 1900’s as well as following many perspectives.If I take a step back, I can see that. While this isn’t a super-cerebral tale that requires quiet and solitude to read, it is a little trickier than than its precedents. It still makes for a wonderful summer read, but it’s certainly going to take a little more effort on the reader’s part.I agree that this one starts with a slow build. Not all readers can get into that; I know many that need action the minute that first page is turned. For those who don’t mind waiting, though, this story is worth it.I agree that there are a ton of narrative voices. Not all of them are characters, either. There are letters, too. While I find each voice to be distinct, I understand that bouncing around between points-of-view can be disrupting to one’s reading pleasure.I understand the complaints. They’re completely valid and real. Actually, I would not recommend this to first-time Palmieri readers. Either start at the beginning with The Witch of Little Italy or with the next one, The Witch of Belladonna Bay: A Novel, which is probably the most accessible of the three, and no, these don’t have to be read in order.My feelings on this story?I give it a solid 3.5 stars.I want to say I liked Belladonna Bay better, but that’s not really true. I liked Byrd better. She’s still my favorite character.In this case, it’s not a person to whom I attached. In this case, I loved the depths of this tale, the diametrically opposed strength and fragility in all relationships: mother and child, husband and wife, alive people and dead people, past and present, best friends. It’s all real and beautiful and horrible.I loved the setting. I’ve only been to New Orleans once and that was for a conference so the city was, of course, on its best behavior. I was charmed. I was there in June and it was hot but the heat, the mugginess, it never bothered me like it does any place else I go. I enjoyed it touching my bare skin all hours of the day. No, I didn’t see much outside of the main tourist areas, but still. Maybe my grandmother, ZZ, infused me with love for a city she visited often and knew better than I ever will. I don’t know but it felt good to near the end of this tale and find myself sheltering from a huge storm on Bourbon Street.I loved the family. All three of the Lost Witch books have family at the center. Mimi, Fee, and Izzy were the ones who charmed me in Little Italy. Daddies, daughters, and nieces stole my heart in Belladonna Bay. This one contains a tighter but worse family and incorporates an element not yet explored: friendship. Friends often become family and friends can hurt you in the way you thought only family could, maybe even moreso.The elements of this tale had me swept up far more than the characters. Not that there was anything wrong with them, there wasn't, it's just that my attention was drawn to the non-people aspects.And here's all the stuff that was here before the review:Pre-Review:Awwww! You guys, she did it again.and she called me brutal! This woman. I swear. She always knows just how to get to me. I'm all teary-eyed, fanning my face, making sniffling noises.Suzy, you can have all my organs. All of them. I don't really know why you'd need them but since you've already got my heart, may as well take the rest, too.

  • Carmen Blankenship
    2018-11-27 13:09

    The Witch of Bourbon Street by Suzanne Palmieri The Witch of Bourbon Street is another book by Suzanne Palmieri set in the South. I absolutely loved it. This is a highly anticipated book for me. I adore books about witches especially when the witches are everyday people with extraordinary abilities. As Suzanne Palmieri calls it “The Shine". After I read Palmieri's book The Witch of Little Italy (I liked it) I decided to immediately buy The Witch of Belladonna Bay (I LOVED IT!) You know how it goes from there.... once you find an author that you connect with..... You find them on Facebook, you friend them on Goodreads and follow them on Twitter... then you impatiently wait until their next book comes out. I was not disappointed. I found The Witch of Bourbon Street captivating. It is hard to sum up a book sometimes without feeling like you're giving away the story. I will say that at the crux of this story it is about family, forgiveness, trust, and owning up the decisions we make, and how our childhood so drastically can affect us as adults. It is at times heavy, at times funny and is sprinkled with a little magic and mystery. I am certainly under Suzanne Palmieri's spell. (oh yes, I went there. Ba da Boom!)Thank you to Netgalley and St Martins press for this advanced copy in exchange for this honest review.

  • Mary
    2018-12-08 16:22

    Another wonderful witchy story from one of my faves Suzanne Palmieri. Set in the Bayou of New Orleans this time, full of the legends and lores of the Cajun country. Each character was well developed and interesting, I loved the ghosts, the ramshackle mansion filled with nature and magic. Filled with history, family love, mistakes, and redemption. A tale skillfully told, spicy as good gumbo, with a most satsfying finish.

  • Nicky
    2018-11-24 17:23

    I was lucky enough to have an advanced copy of this book. Let me tell you, it doesn't disappoint if you've followed Palmieri's other novels. Her descriptions are more lush and the entire story is tinged with magic and melancholy while keeping you hopeful. I love her words. I will forever sing this woman's praises. Love love love.

  • Gina Heron
    2018-12-02 15:15

    Come get lost in the bayou with Suzy. And in the beautiful words. She has all the beautiful words.But be ready, because it's a little like flinging yourself outside in the middle of a hurricane as you swirl back and forth through histories and narrations and the beauty that is Louisiana. That kind of power and beauty is totally worth the ride, though, right?

  • Wendy
    2018-12-07 17:11

    The Witch of Bourbon StreetI was waiting on a book to become available from the library when I came across this novel and of course I couldn't resist it with the title. I liked the Bourbon Street part but not the witch part so much. I should have just went with my instincts and passed on it but I didn't. I guess if you are into witches and ghosts then this would be a novel for you but it definitely wasn't for me.

  • ☕ Kimberly
    2018-11-25 12:30

    Caffeinated Aspects:Setting: Witches on Bourbon Street primarily takes place at Sorrow Estate set deep in the bayou of Tivoli Parish, Louisiana. The tale switches between the past and the present focusing on several characters and the murders of 1902. The landscape is lush and fascinating as we learn about the Sorrow family. The Sorrow Estate and the surrounding bayou where characters as well and I found myself longing to go there.The family: What a colorful, dysfunctional family the Sorrow family is. Palmieri invites us in to this eccentric family sharing their beginnings in New Orleans from the murders to the troubles of present day. We get perspectives from Frances Green Sorrow who once embraced her families’ abilities and has since closed herself off from it. We learn her story as she suddenly wakes one day ready to embrace her gift and life once again. Then there is her young son Jack, who wants his parents back together again. We also get the perspective of Sippy, Frances' secret. The characters are quirky and I was immediately drawn to them. Frances’ story was touching.Magic: Herbal remedies, fortune telling, a shop on Bourbon Street and the Book of Sorrow add magical elements to this story. Crow, a bird who aids this family was an interesting creature. Then there are the ghosts who still linger on the bayou. I loved speaking with the ghosts and learning their secrets. Palmieri weaved her magic and even had me believing.The Murders: Traveling back to 1902 and learning about the murders at the Sorrow Estate, and of the Nun accused of killing them and a still unsolved disappearance held me spellbound. We get some present day mystery too when a young child goes missing.Romance: We learn of Frances' on and off again romance with Jack’s father, their marriage and separation. This is a second chance romance filled with love, forgiveness and redemption. It was a subtle thread but an important one.Standalone: The tale is a standalone and Palmieri wraps things up resolving both the past and present issues. I closed the book satisfied and smiling.Decaffeinated Aspects:Balance: The tale captivated me, but the different perspectives and time changes never really allowed me to lose myself within its pages. The first part of the book was a tad slow for me, and the last had me flipping the pages at warp speed. I wanted more details about certain characters and less about other things.Language: While I actually loved this attention to detail, some may find it makes the reading cumbersome. Palmieri paid particular attention to the dialect of her characters. She brought us that rich southern New Orleans speech from the educated to the rural dialect of the bayou.Characters: The characters are unique, and Frances’ story a painful one but as a mother, I had difficulty connected with some of her decisions. I loved Sippy and Jack. I do wish Jack’s father was fleshed out more, but with the past/present timeline, it was difficult to really get to know them all.Copy provided by the publisher. This review was originally posted on Caffeinated Book Reviewer

  • Laura Morrigan
    2018-12-04 11:17

    I absolutely loved this book, and give it my full recommendation. In this book, Palmieri creates a strong sense of the landscape of community of New Orleans and the Louisiana bayou. The magical elements are intriguing and believable, but the focus remains on the characters. We meet a wonderful cast of quirky people, the strange Sorrow family of the Tivoli Parish, an old and once noble family now laughed at, while sometimes admired for their supposed magical powers that mostly seem to take the form of telling futures at 13 Bourbon Street.Frances Sorrow was meant to save the family, but she lost faith in herself and in her magic a long time ago, now things are changing and it is finally time to put her life and her family back together. This is a great story about fixing your mistakes, about the importance of family, and about how nobody is perfect. It is a story about magic, but also about the magic in friendship, family and accepting yourself for who you are. Running a parallel to the modern day story is the mystery of the the murder and disappearance of the old Sorrow family, the ancestors a hundred years ago, which has bearing on present events.The book has a bit of a Gothic feel to it, and a wonderful sense of magic and the lively and unique lifestyle of Louisiana. I really enjoyed my visits to Tivoli Parish and Bourbon Street! I really loved the big old house with the plants getting in through the holes in the roof. It was also a nice reminder that it is never too late to fix your mistakes and make things right.6 stars out of 5

  • Christa
    2018-12-07 13:21

    This is the first book I've read by Suzanne Palmieri, and at first I didn't know if I was going to like the main character, Frances Sorrow. I was feeling a little skeptical of the whole premise, but then the story really pulled me in. I ended up loving the characters, enjoying the storyline, and feeling good at the end of the book. It was one I enjoyed, and I will be reading more by the author.Frances Sorrow comes from a line of women who know they are witches and who are unlucky in love. Frances tried to overcome that, but ended up living on her family's land as almost a hermit. She doesn't see her ex-husbnad or her son, Jack, unless she has to. All of her issues stem from a traumatic experience when she was sixteen that she hasn't shared with anyone. As the parts of her life begin to collide, she has to see if she can make peace with the past and enjoy her future.The Witch of Bourbon Street was a very good book. I thought the settings were wonderful, and they came together with sympathetic characters and an intriguing storyline to create a great book. I like Palmieri's writing style, and the flow of the book. Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for providing a copy of the book in return for an honest review.

  • Holly
    2018-12-05 11:18

    I will start by saying I only read half of this book. By the time I made it that far I still did not care about any of the characters, and I was flat out bored. It's like someone took a story from Sarah Addison Allen and drained it of personality and charm. That might sound harsh, but that's how it felt. I did skip to the almost end and read some of how things got wrapped up, but I didn't even finish that because I just didn't care.

  • Maria
    2018-12-11 09:10

    There’s something quite magical about Suzanne Palmieri. I believe someone once said that writing was easy, that it was all about sitting down and bleeding onto a page. As poetic as that sounds, I think that what Suzanne Palmieri does goes beyond that. Not only does she allow her characters to borrow the emotions they then wear across the pages, she also breathes life into them, she breathes herself into them. I think that was why I fell in love with her novels in the first place. There’s a soul to them and it’s beautiful to watch it unfold in front of us. And the acceptance… the love, the hope, the fear… it’s all so palpable and humane… Sigh.That said, I think I can now start talking about this novel in particular.The Witch of Bourbon Street is a hurricane.If you have read The Witch of Little Italy and/or The Witch of Belladonna Bay, I can promise you one thing: The Witch of Bourbon Street is a revolution. I found it to be way darker, heavier. Even the space between the words felt thicker.I must confess I felt slightly lost at first. There were a lot of voices, faces, memories… and they all kept claiming my full attention at the same time. I honestly didn’t know what to do. It was like being in the middle of a roundabout with an endless number of exits. Where was I supposed to go? Then it hit me. We have to admit to be lost before trying to find our own path, ourselves. And that was exactly what I did.I am not going to lie to you. Bonding with these characters wasn’t easy at first. You see, they are not the kind to try and make you love them for something they are not. Instead, they just exhale their true colours and leave you to deal with it. And it’s so easy to judge them, isn’t it? That is until you realise that what they are doing is quite a refreshing thing, something to be admired and not judged. They are not playing a part depending on context, or assuming roles in different plays. No, they are being themselves. How rare is that? And what a challenge it must be!These characters, though. The name Sorrow fits them like a glove. You can feel it clinging to your skin as you go through the pages. They wear their stories and histories, their memories and their mistakes… and they wear them proudly. It’s quite a breathtaking view.Speaking of breathtaking, I should probably mention the enchanting landscapes that Suzanne Palmieri painted in The Witch of Bourbon Street. They are so rich you can almost smell the gardens and feel the endless colours of the sunset. Ah, the details. There’s definitely a key to every lock and Suzanne Palmieri just keeps opening these majestic doors… Sigh.Here’s hoping for another novel soon!P.S. (view spoiler)[Oh, the wonderful Byrd. It was fantastic to see her again. She’s so… everything. And for some weird reason she feels so warm… (hide spoiler)]

  • Vivian
    2018-12-11 16:14

    The Sorrow family is just that, a family filled with a history of sorrow. Due to a tragedy in 1901, the subsequent generations of Sorrows have had to deal with the idea that their family is cursed. The current generation of Sorrow women consist of Frances (Frankie), her mother Claudette, and her grandmother Dida. Claudette suffered a tragic injury causing blindness when she was only four years old. Claudette's lover and father to Frankie drowned in an accident at sea. Frankie has turned her back on the world because she feels guilt over an incident that occurred when she was sixteen years old. Frankie's son Jack has decided to take it upon himself to bring his parents back together using whatever magic he can work. The Witch of Bourbon Street is a multigenerational story that weaves magic in with love lost, love found, family, and forgiveness.There are a lot of characters to keep track of in this story. We have Frances "Frankie" Sorrow and her family: Belinda "Dida" Sorrow (grandmother), Old Jim Green (grandfather), Claudette "Claudie" Sorrow (mother), Daniel Amore (ex-husband and father to Jack), Jack Amore (Frankie's son), Millie Bliss (Jackie’s best friend and surrogate sister), and Sippie Wallace (Frankie's daughter). The supporting cast includes: Eight Track (Sippie's adoptive father), Simone (Sippie's deceased adoptive mother), Junebug (the bartender at Voodoo), and Mr. Craven (historical society worker) . . . and a lot of ghosts. There's the bar at 13 Bourbon Street in New Orleans that is owned by the Sorrow family, the Voodoo bar in Tivoli Parish that is managed by Millie, the bayou, and the Sorrow family estate. Add in a family history of witchcraft and magic along with the hidden story behind the tragedy of 1901 and you've got all the makings for a somewhat convoluted yet intriguing story that spans generations and time.I found The Witch of Bourbon Street to be a bit confusing a first simply because it was bouncing back and forth in time (1901 and the present), and then bouncing between perspectives. Once I had all of the major characters clear in my head and their relationships to one another it was a bit easier to keep track of everything. The story really began to pick up when Sippie located her biological family and was reunited with them. There's quite a bit of backstory that has to be dealt with before we get to the action precipitated by Jack's disappearance. Can Frankie and Danny overcome their differences and build a lasting relationship? Will Frankie, Danny, and Sippie be able to find Jack? What's the mystery behind the Sorrow family tragedy in 1901? These questions and many more are answered fully when the past and present overlap in The Witch of Bourbon Street. This story is perfect for anyone that enjoys reading about love, forgiveness, and family drama with hints of magic.

  • Lisa
    2018-12-01 17:14

    I have to be honest, this book was not what I expected and left me very disappointed. Having previously read and enjoyed The Witch of Little Italy, I looked forward to opening up Suzanne Palmieri's newest release, The Witch of Bourbon Street, for some magical escapism. It started off well with the intriguing 'confession' of Sister-Nurse Vesta Grace regarding the deaths of nearly an entire family of Sorrows from Serafina's Bayou in 1901. This first chapter was wonderfully enigmatic and immediately sparked my interest; I was eager to learn more.However, immediately following that tantalizing first chapter, we are thrust into the less appealing contemporary storyline where we spend most of the remainder of the book. Much of this portion of the book is written in a very different style, and while the author admirably seeks to capture the atmosphere and dialects of the setting, some readers may find it a little distracting and unwieldy to read. It certainly took me a few chapters or more to settle into. There are also numerous POV changes which make the narrative feel somewhat disjointed and can be confusing at times.The modern day Sorrows are a rather dysfunctional lot with plenty of family drama, secrets, and underlying tensions - and lots and lots of bickering (too much, in my opinion). The threads of this tale are interesting but take such a long time to develop and finally intertwine that I found the first part of the book a struggle to get through. I actually considered abandoning this book more than once and did set it aside a few times because it just didn't hold my interest and felt as though the plot was lost somewhere out in the swamp.Thankfully, things begin to pick up roughly 2/3 of the way through when we start to learn more about the mystery hinted at in the opening pages. I enjoyed discovering the history of that earlier generation of Sorrows and found this aspect of the tale much more engaging. Ultimately, however, I was disappointed with the resolution of this family's tragic end. Having been built up as such a longstanding unsolved puzzle, the eventual answers regarding the suspected murders seemed quite flat to me. And after taking almost the entire book to get back to the mystery, it was dealt with so quickly and summarily that I felt little satisfaction in the solution.My full review can be found on the blog: http://greatreadsandtealeaves.blogspo...

  • Sojourner
    2018-11-16 10:14

    Author Suzanne Palmieri who earlier brought to us delightful stories such as The Witch of Little Italy, The Witch of Belladonna Bay, I’ll Be Seeing You and Empire Girls returns with her most ambitious novel yet, a sweeping story of love, heartbreak, forgiveness, redemption and family in The Witch of Bourbon Street. But the novel is unlikely to sweep many readers off their as it is a tad slow in its pacing, though Suzanne Palmieri has managed to craft an incredibly haunting story that many readers would love to revisit again.The Witch of Bourbon Street by Suzanne Palmieri is about the past and its reverberations in the present, casting a cloud of uncertainty for the future, in the once magical Sorrow family living in the bayou of New Orleans. It is the story of Frances Green Sorrow who was considered special, someone who would restore the honor and prestige of the Sorrow family. But she has other plans. She ran off, and got into a hurried marriage with Danny Amore which lasted as long as the birth of her son, Jack Amore Sorrow. Frances returned home, keeping to herself and shunning the outside world, completely detaching herself. But this time things didn’t go as she planned. Her son disappeared, mysteriously.The story actually began on August 14, 1901 with Sister Vesta Grace’s confession. It was an uneasy time. All but one member of the once well-known Sorrow family had died. It was rumoured that Sister Vesta Grace had a hand in their death yet there were others who believed it was the voodoo witch, Rosella. It remained unsolved for over a century. As Frances ventured out of the confines of the Sorrow Estate in search of her son, she stumbled on secrets that unraveled the mysteries of the past, opened the floodgates for its healing and set the ghosts that haunted the family free.Employing the alternating chapter method, the story moves back and forth between the past and the present, with shifting points of views from Frances, Jack, Danny, Millie and Sippie Wallace, and a peculiar dialogue which some may find difficult in the initial stages. While the story is enjoyable to a certain degree, some may find it tough to wade through the first half of the book which was a little bit trying. But once you got through, you will find everything falling into place nicely.

  • Laura Morrigan
    2018-11-30 12:10

    Review from my bloghttp://rosesandvellum.blogspot.com.au...I absolutely loved this book, and give it my full recommendation. In this book, Palmieri creates a strong sense of the landscape of community of New Orleans and the Louisiana bayou. The magical elements are intriguing and believable, but the focus remains on the characters. We meet a wonderful cast of quirky people, the strange Sorrow family of the Tivoli Parish, an old and once noble family now laughed at, while sometimes admired for their supposed magical powers that mostly seem to take the form of telling futures at 13 Bourbon Street.Frances Sorrow was meant to save the family, but she lost faith in herself and in her magic a long time ago, now things are changing and it is finally time to put her life and her family back together. This is a great story about fixing your mistakes, about the importance of family, and about how nobody is perfect. It is a story about magic, but also about the magic in friendship, family and accepting yourself for who you are. Running a parallel to the modern day story is the mystery of the the murder and disappearance of the old Sorrow family, the ancestors a hundred years ago, which has bearing on present events.The book has a bit of a Gothic feel to it, and a wonderful sense of magic and the lively and unique lifestyle of Louisiana. I really enjoyed my visits to Tivoli Parish and Bourbon Street! I really loved the big old house with the plants getting in through the holes in the roof. It was also a nice reminder that it is never too late to fix your mistakes and make things right.6 stars out of 5

  • Julie Valerie
    2018-11-26 11:32

    The Witch of Bourbon Street is every bit as wonderful as the other book I read by Suzanne Palmieri, The Witch of Belladonna Bay, which has me planning to read The Witch of Little Italy as soon as I can get my hands on it.A captivating story with a strong sense of place, The Witch of Bourbon Street weaves memorable characters (with fabulous names) in and out of time through their connections to the tragic circumstances that befell the Sorrow family at the turn of the century.At the heart of the story is family. Specifically, Millie and Frances the Great, but also Frances and her son, Jack, and her estranged daughter, Sippie Wallace. In a real cool scene early in the novel, Sippie "travels" with Crow - a crow who acts as a weather vane, only showing up when things are about to change - to Serafina's Bayou, to learn from and hopefully heal the witches living there. There's a Book of Sorrows, the legacy of the Sorrow family, and ghosts and witches with so much depth and backstory, I was completely sucked in. Bewitched, you might say, by another one of the "witch books" by Suzanne Palmieri. Read two, will read the third, and certainly hope there's a fourth book coming soon. I'd have to consult the tarot, but I suspect, the fourth book might be set in Massachusetts?Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. For complete coverage, visit my book blog at www.julievalerie.com/suzanne-palmieri/

  • Abby Zampardi
    2018-11-15 11:29

    I received an ARC of this book from the publisher and Goodreads in exchange for an honest review.This book contained many elements that I really enjoyed, such as the witch/voodoo aspect, and the Southern Gothic-esque tale of the Sorrow family's past. Even though I tend to read a decent amount of books with witchy elements, this had a pretty original story line and I liked the way that it came together. As a critique, I found it fairly difficult to get through the beginning of the book between adjusting to the shifting points of view, time periods, and the very, very emphasized Southern/New Orleans/rural dialect in most of the characters' dialogue, but it got better and easier to follow as the book went on. I'm open to the possibility of exploring the author's other works despite these difficulties since this was an unpolished ARC.

  • Teresa Kander
    2018-11-21 17:14

    The book actually tells two stories--one in 1901/1902 and the other in 2014. They both involve the Sorrow family and witchcraft. In spite of the witchcraft angle, I found the novel to be more about love, forgiveness, and family--a family which just happens to include witches.The story alternates chapters between the past and the present and alternates viewpoints of characters as well. Some people may find that difficult to follow, but I feel that it adds more depth to the story. The characters are presented with obvious flaws, making them easy to relate to and believe. And the story doesn't excuse those flaws, or "fix" them by the end of the story, which is also realistic. This is yet another new to me author presented by this challenge, and I hope to find time to read her earlier two witch books in the future.

  • Susan Obryan
    2018-11-13 12:33

    If you enjoy the culture and mystique of New Orleans and Louisiana bayous, "The Witch of Bourbon Street" will draw you into a jazzy, humid French Quarter and its nearby spirit-filled plantations. Suzanne Palmieri has created the isolated world of Sorrow Estate, once a flourishing mansion in a tucked-away bayou. The Sorrows were known for their other-worldly connections, but now the lineage has dwindled down to a final few. Ghosts drift in and out, stuck in time, as Frances Sorrow, her son and newly acquainted daughter come to grips with changing times and attitudes. What will it take to heal the past and protect the future? As Palmieri writes, it takes strength, spirit - and a touch of magic.ARC provided by Netgalley

  • Natalia
    2018-12-01 10:36

    I received this book as a goodreads first-read giveaway.The Witch of Bourbon Street is an entertaining read. It tells the story of the distant past, recent past and present of the Sorrows family, a magical family living in the bayou. Above all, the story is about love, family, heartbreak, dealing with hurt and forgiveness. It was a little difficult for me to get into at first, the story switches point of view, time period, and location, but I found myself getting absorbed into the story. There were some aspects of it that I thought could have been expanded on a bit more, like perhaps Sippie's relationship with Frankie, or Rosella as a character, but all together, it was entertaining, light-hearted and fun.

  • Vi
    2018-12-01 16:19

    The Sorrow family women are witches, healers, seers, from a long line. Suffering started for the family in 1901, "when lies and secrets festered," and continue today.Frances was "seen," as the powerful witch who'd restore the Sorrow family to it's prior glory. But Frances was broken inside due to secrets and lies. She walked away from her son, Jack and her husband, Danny. Jack, 12 years old, decides to bring his family back together, with an ingenious plan...This dramatic and consuming saga is both chiller and thriller! There are ghosts and it moves thru different time periods. Stay with it and you'll be glad you did!Book free for honest review.

  • Leigh Hewett
    2018-12-06 17:07

    Lost Witches everywhere will love this book! The Sorrow family drew me in to the lush backdrop of New Orleans, with twist and turns that kept me turning the pages. I found myself swept through time, reliving the saga with the characters. This is one of those books that stayed with me long after I read the last page, missing the Sorrow ladies and wishing that I could linger with them a bit longer. Frances comes a long way by the end of the story, and I enjoyed every crazy step I spent with her along the way. A great summer read!!!

  • Leah
    2018-12-02 10:23

    This book has a really slow start; there were a few occasions where I wanted to quit reading because I really didn't think it was going to get any better. But it did. Somewhere along the way, I found myself locked in the room with my nose practically pressed to the screen of my e-reader. This was a fascinating read; filled with mystery, intrigue, some romance, family ... magic. Definitely magic. Suzanne Palmieri's play with words was beautiful and there were so many parts that were quotable that I filled almost half a notebook with them. Great book -- an entertaining and engrossing read!

  • Alyssa
    2018-11-27 15:08

    Magic, romance, family secrets, and mystery are all wonderfully blended in this novel against the backdrop of New Orleans and the Louisiana bayous. The cast of characters is large, yet Palmieri masterfully renders the tangles and complexities of their relationships with one another. I've never read another book quite like this one, and it was a lovely, original, and even magical read - easy to immerse yourself in.

  • Sue
    2018-11-25 16:30

    Suzanne Palmieri, I don't know how you do it, but you got it just right. I'm always stunned, but delighted, when an author gives me everything I want, in one book - characters to care for, to invest in; atmosphere; a story line that stays just a teeny bit mysterious, right to the end; and, the rarest of all - a house (or in this case, an entire estate) that is one of the characters in the story.Please tell me there are more "witch" books in the future.

  • Debbi
    2018-11-19 10:26

    I already miss the people in this book, as well as the bayou! This was an intriguing story(ies). There were a few plotlines brought to conclusion a bit hurriedly, but i still enjoyed this book. It could have used a few food references , though, i mean it took place partially in New Orleans, for goodness sake

  • Jantine Kampes
    2018-11-26 09:10

    This is the kind of book that's perfect to read in summer. Think of long, warm summer evenings, that may or may not turn into storms. Swamps and beaches, smelly sweet flowers, free and wild women, and ghosts, loads and loads of ghosts. I loved the atmosphere set by this book, and found myself fully emerged into it.I received a free copy through Netglley in return for an honest review.

  • Beverly Carp
    2018-12-08 09:23

    **I won this as a Goodreads arc giveaway**I truly enjoyed the magic of this book, the magic of new Orleans, the bayou, family, love lost, love found, and loved renewed. It pulls you into the swamps with them and you feel to be a part of the Sorrow family with your own magic as well.