Read Artichoke to Za'atar: Modern Middle Eastern Food by Greg Malouf Lucy Malouf Online

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This richly illustrated book offers a comprehensive collection of 170 recipes, organized alphabetically according to ingredients widely used in Middle Eastern cooking. Written by award-winning chef Greg Malouf and his writing partner, Lucy Malouf, Artichoke to Za'atar covers everything from the basics—almonds, lemons, and yogurt—to less widely known components such as pomeThis richly illustrated book offers a comprehensive collection of 170 recipes, organized alphabetically according to ingredients widely used in Middle Eastern cooking. Written by award-winning chef Greg Malouf and his writing partner, Lucy Malouf, Artichoke to Za'atar covers everything from the basics—almonds, lemons, and yogurt—to less widely known components such as pomegranates, rose water, and sumac. A brief description and history of each ingredient is provided, along with invaluable tips on how to select, prepare, and cook it. Originally published in 1999 as Arabesque, this book has earned international acclaim as the ultimate guide to modern Middle Eastern cuisine by a chef who is considered a master of the genre. Artichoke to Za'atar is a volume to read, use, and treasure—a must for anyone interested in creative cooking and culinary history. Now available in North America for the first time....

Title : Artichoke to Za'atar: Modern Middle Eastern Food
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780520254138
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 352 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Artichoke to Za'atar: Modern Middle Eastern Food Reviews

  • Heidi
    2018-11-23 11:18

    Not exactly traditional... The author adapts middle eastern recipes to a westernized gourmet style, from what I can tell. But some recipes do look interesting.Later: Maybe it's because I'm still getting used to middle eastern cooking, but this take on it, either layout nor recipes, was not appealing to me. "Parsley salad with Parmesan crumbed brains"? "Squid stuffed with pork and pistachios"? Just traditional recipes with some fun twists seem exotic enough for me, this was just too far out. But for someone who's already had his/her fill of this cuisine in its basic form and is looking to branch out further, this might be just perfect.

  • Rebecca Johnson
    2018-12-03 08:19

    This is a fantastic book! It covers the basics and goes into more advanced cooking skills. For instance, poke holes in eggplants and cook on naked flame on stove until they bubble and turn black and fall in on themselves. Yummy! Covered what to do with every ingredient in alphabetical order with and gives great detail on how to maximize the flavor of each! Really enjoyed the section on parsley, the section on cilantro, and the section on dukkah. I have never made dukkah and can't wait to make and try it!

  • Happyreader
    2018-11-14 11:21

    This is a very quirky middle eastern cookbook from an Lebanese Australian chef whose western culinary training has led him to tweak his middle eastern culinary style. Organized by ingredients like cumin, yogurt, and lentils, each ingredient is introduced with a discussion of traditional uses, storage, and use followed by a couple of recipes, some not so traditional like preserved lemon guacamole with smoked eel and pinenut wafers or red mullet fried in cumin flour. There are also a lot of desserts, if you looking for some new middle eastern sweets.

  • Alexia
    2018-11-30 11:24

    i love artichokes and za'atar. but i don't love this book. in theory modern middle eastern food sounds like the american updates that people have made to account for long-lost ingredients not found at the local supermarket. not so. there's a salmon kibbie. i'm not even arab and i think this is sacrilegious. some good notes about sumac and za'atar, and how to use those glorious artichokes, but that's about it.

  • Stuart
    2018-12-04 08:22

    Organized alephbetically by ingredient, Malouf is an Aussie (Melbourne) restaurant chef who offers slightly more elegant presentations of traditional foods. Unlike books like Claudia Roden's Middle Eastern Food which offers collections of old family (and familiar) recipes, this book is slightly more process driven and could well serve as a text to find out what to do with those treasures you always find when you ramble through the ethnic groceries' aisles.

  • Casey
    2018-11-24 07:00

    Honestly, I haven't cooked anything from this book yet, but it is absolutely beautiful. It's filled with delicious looking recipes and lots of information. I love the layout. I love the "modern middle eastern" a-z's. I love that each chapter is broken up by these flavors or ingredients unusual to most American food. The pictures are delectable. I look forward to cooking up some delicious food soon.

  • Nikki
    2018-12-06 07:57

    This book is incredible and it's made want to read all the Malouf's other works. The recipes are beautiful, the writing is a beauty to read, and the few pictures that are sectioned into the text are lovely. I don't think I had a single criticism of this book. Now I just have to find a way to make all the food.

  • Sarah
    2018-11-27 08:19

    Initially, I didn't think I would like or get much from this one-- the format was not easy to navigate and the recipes seemed so dramatic and complex. But there are some gems in here! I am seriously debating this as a purchase, and I don't often buy cookbooks.

  • Beka
    2018-11-25 14:10

    I really liked how the recipes were grouped together by their highlighted ingredients, but as with so many cookbooks (especially foreign ones), I wish there more pictures and that they were right next to their accompanying recipes.

  • Brian
    2018-12-08 10:04

    This is a good one for its organization around ingredients, I've been trying to use a wider variety of spices, vegs, etc. so its nice to build a dish from the contents up.