Read Evolution: Making Sense of Life by Carl Zimmer Douglas J. Emlen Online

evolution-making-sense-of-life

Science writer Carl Zimmer and evolutionary biologist Douglas Emlen have teamed up to write a textbook intended for biology majors that will inspire students while delivering a solid foundation in evolutionary biology. Zimmer brings the same story-telling skills he displayed in The Tangled Bank, his 2009 non-majors textbook that the Quarterly Review of Biology called "specScience writer Carl Zimmer and evolutionary biologist Douglas Emlen have teamed up to write a textbook intended for biology majors that will inspire students while delivering a solid foundation in evolutionary biology. Zimmer brings the same story-telling skills he displayed in The Tangled Bank, his 2009 non-majors textbook that the Quarterly Review of Biology called "spectacularly successful." Emlen, an award-winning evolutionary biologist at the University of Montana, has infused Evolution: Making Sense of Life with the technical rigor and conceptual depth that today's biology majors require. Students will learn the fundamental concepts of evolutionary theory, such as natural selection, genetic drift, phylogeny, and coevolution. Evolution: Making Sense of Life also drives home the relevance of evolution for disciplines ranging from conservation biology to medicine. With riveting stories about evolutionary biologists at work everywhere from the Arctic to tropical rain forests to hospital wards, the book is a reading adventure designed to grab the imagination of the students, showing them exactly why it is that evolution makes such brilliant sense of life....

Title : Evolution: Making Sense of Life
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781936221691
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 707 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Evolution: Making Sense of Life Reviews

  • Tfalcone
    2018-09-24 13:34

    Great textbook, wish I could teach a whole course!

  • M
    2018-08-26 15:16

    Well written and accessible for a text book.

  • Jeannie
    2018-08-30 21:13

    Read for USF's Organic Evolution lecture course.To begin with, I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. The language was clear and concise, making the subject matter considerably more palatable to read than similar texts have in the past. The accompanying images and graphs are good throughout, and helped me to build on my understanding of the material by offering numerous visual cues. That being said, the concision of the writing often reduced the subjects and terminology into ideas beyond full comprehension, offering little or no contextual support, and requiring me to seek information from outside sources. This was especially true when completing the accompanying quizzes and study guides, which often focused on concepts poorly covered in the text, and were rife with errors of every design and order.This entire course was spent compensating for--and criticizing--what the text and accompanying materials lack. Though unconventional, the structure of the course, as it was forced by the limitations of the text, allowed for increased insight into many of the concepts surrounding evolutionary theory.In general, I like the direction Zimmer and Emlen took with this textbook. The concept is great--introducing university students to evolution through succinct, modern, and highly readable language--and it has the potential to be an excellent addition to the lexicon of the life sciences. I do hope the authors recognize these shortcomings and produce more thorough editions in the future.

  • Joanna
    2018-09-07 13:33

    Used for UCLA's LS1 classZimmer dryly covers a lot of basic terminology in biology, which makes this a pretty average textbook. He includes a lot of specific anecdotes of animals to make his point and then adds a picture of the animal, which I thought was the best part of the book. The pictures are colorful and a warm welcome when faced with a page of dry text defining some obscure term in biology. Plus, whereas you'll never care (or, in my case, remember) what the Buri experiment is, at least you'll remember what a Harlequin beetle or an okapi looks like. The book is already slightly outdated as it mentions that "over half of the genome is composed of neither genes, nor vestiges of human genes, nor regulatory regions" (p.132) though the junk DNA concept has been debunked; again, just part of being an average textbook. If you're looking for something interesting in biology to read, pick up Bryson's Short History of Nearly Everything or go search up animal pictures and see where that takes you. In three words: expensive, dry, basic.

  • Kevin Warman
    2018-08-25 14:09

    I read this text for BWU's Bio310: Evolution and thoroughly enjoyed it. The text is easy to read and understand. The authors provide many examples and illustrations to tie concepts to real life. Likewise, the graphs and charts are accessible. I would precariously suggest that they improve one or two chapters that are heavier on math. Nevertheless, this text is perfect for students and enthusiasts who want to leant more about evolution.

  • Elizabeth
    2018-09-19 18:38

    As seen on ScienceOnline.

  • Albina
    2018-09-22 20:08

    Great textbook on evolution, a pleasure to read and explains things well. Lots of great illustrations, figures and tables. The index could be better.