Read Coal Hollow: Photographs and Oral Histories by Melanie Light Ken Light Online

coal-hollow-photographs-and-oral-histories

Coal is still king in much of Appalachia, yet the heritage and history of the people who enabled the United States to become an economic superpower in the Industrial age are slipping away. This remarkable book presents arresting black and white photographs and powerful oral histories that chronicle the legacy of coalmining in southern West Virginia. Ken and Melanie Light tCoal is still king in much of Appalachia, yet the heritage and history of the people who enabled the United States to become an economic superpower in the Industrial age are slipping away. This remarkable book presents arresting black and white photographs and powerful oral histories that chronicle the legacy of coalmining in southern West Virginia. Ken and Melanie Light traveled hundreds of miles through rugged, isolated terrain recording the stories of a range of people whose lives were shaped by coal: retired miners, men and women who have been jobless their entire lives, a contemporary coal baron, a justice of the State Supreme Court of West Virginia, a writer who bravely ran for governor on a third party ticket, and people who returned to the hills when their lives failed elsewhere. What emerges is a complex portrait of people locked into an intricate web of geography, history, and unfettered profiteering. In Light’s poignant images and in their own distinctive voices the residents of Coal Hollow—a fictional composite of the communities the Lights surveyed—reveal how the intersection of mountain culture and the greed of the coal companies produced the most powerful economy in the world yet brought crushing poverty to a region of once-proud people....

Title : Coal Hollow: Photographs and Oral Histories
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780520246546
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 151 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Coal Hollow: Photographs and Oral Histories Reviews

  • R.L.
    2018-10-23 23:08

    The photography is amazing in this book. The oral histories are poignant. Yet, when taken as a whole, I believe the book can not possibly be an accurate portrayal of the people of West Virginia. Note here that there are only ten oral histories in the book. I've been to West Virginia and have seen nothing of what I see in this book. I've also stayed with friends in a "hollow" in Tennessee and there was one house that would have fit in well with these shown in the book, with a mule being used to plow the garden and everything. It was just down the mountain from a hand-crafted beaut of a mansion. I think if you go anywhere, even my neighborhood in Houston, TX, you will find houses representative of people who would throw trash out the front door and leave it there. But they would be few and far between. My political science professor said it best. "It isn't money that makes CLASS. CLASS is how you keep your front yard." I agree with some of the politics of the book but I also believe that the book isn't an honest portrayal and so this negates the political slant. There could have been a little less sensationalism and a little more realism and it would have gotten the point across.

  • Peacegal
    2018-10-20 02:31

    I liked the photos. Many told of great pain and heartache; many were quite beautiful. The recorded histories offered here, especially by the old miners, are priceless. Yet, this type of book makes me uncomfortable as well. There is the undeniable smack of elitism; city people hauling in their fancy photography equipment, publishing books that most of their subjects couldn't afford. Is this how most of the rest of the country sees my home state?

  • Aaron the Pink Donut
    2018-10-30 00:14

    A Very good book overall. The photos are kinda unremarkable, but the oral histories contained in the book are magnificent.