Read Vampire Vultures by John Fahey Online

vampire-vultures

A wide range of memoir-like pieces, including interviews, letters, and verse, makes this collection a fitting companion to Fahey's How Bluegrass Music Destroyed My Life. Published posthumously, this volume rounds out the life of the legendary guitarist and composer, providing more backstory behind his creative ferocity. The stories provide a personal view into decades of hA wide range of memoir-like pieces, including interviews, letters, and verse, makes this collection a fitting companion to Fahey's How Bluegrass Music Destroyed My Life. Published posthumously, this volume rounds out the life of the legendary guitarist and composer, providing more backstory behind his creative ferocity. The stories provide a personal view into decades of his poignant insights into life and music....

Title : Vampire Vultures
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780965618373
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 129 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Vampire Vultures Reviews

  • Jerry Oliver
    2018-12-25 12:40

    I'm really glad I read this book. Fahey is special to me and there are special moments in this book but it is not as magical and transcendent as How Bluegrass Music Destroyed My Life. In that book we learned of Fahey's tragic upbringing and tales of his pedophile father but it was more creatively palpable than in Vultures. Parts of Vampire Vultures are harder to swallow and a few chapters seem to be stuck in just because they exist, and maybe that is a good enough reason, but it still cuases the book to suffer in quality. Still, I would read anything by or about John Fahey. I wish he was still here creating great music and spewing forth the ramblings of his mind and soul, entertaining us and challenging us all at once.

  • Paul Bryant
    2019-01-13 11:45

    Speaking as a Fahey completist, this one was hard to read, a miserable collection of rants about his childhood with only a few touches of the mad humour which graces all his other writings. Ghastly and depressing.

  • Rudolphf Hatter
    2019-01-12 06:21

    The story which the title got its name is incredible -- like a dream initiation of dealing with repressed emotions & memories from his childhood -- finally finding his "book of hate" and no longer being afraid of it. The story gets pretty surreal -- enemas turning into dying and writhing snakes, seeing his grandma riding her gigantic enema stick fall from the sky screaming like a shooting star, the pocketbook of death, finding an uzi and killing his family, etc.I don't remember much else of the other stories in this collection, i agree it wasn't as fun as his first book, BUT THIS STORY for me was incredible.

  • Bob
    2018-12-23 14:25

    I looked at "How Bluegrass Music Destroyed My Life" some years ago but either I didn't pay close enough attention, or Fahey's themes are much darker and more obsessive in this volume. In any event, the vignettes about his romantic life have a bit of Bukowski about them and his childhood seems to have been rather marred. Whether all that, plus his cartoon-like alternate theology, sheds light on his 1960s and 70s brilliance or his flawed but fascinating last 15 years is anyone's guess.

  • James
    2019-01-07 13:31

    This book is amazing. John Fahey is amazing. Art as therapy. Therapy (refuge) from art. I know I'm no artist, but this book hurts my feelings it's so good...cobbled together from various sources this is a grim collection of childhood recollections, autobiographical collage, correspondence, fiction, ephemera, etc.

  • Benjamin Currie
    2019-01-11 07:39

    Incomplete and pretty miserable. Stick with "how bluegrass music destroyed my life" unless you must read all his published work. Great musician and unique perspective and voice, but this is not a finished piece by any account.

  • Hoelk
    2019-01-03 11:42

    Short. Lots of forewords. more cat people