Read The Biggest Twitch: Around the World in 4,000 birds by Alan Davies Ruth Miller Online

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Most people dream of packing in their humdrum city life, selling up andheading off into the unknown for a life of adventure. For Ruth Millerand Alan Davies this dream became a reality, albeit with a twist; theydecided to pack in their jobs, sell their house and take on theultimate birder's challenge - to smash the world record for the numberof species seen in one calendarMost people dream of packing in their humdrum city life, selling up andheading off into the unknown for a life of adventure. For Ruth Millerand Alan Davies this dream became a reality, albeit with a twist; theydecided to pack in their jobs, sell their house and take on theultimate birder's challenge - to smash the world record for the numberof species seen in one calendar year.This book is the story of their great expedition, searching for birdsfrom Ecuador to Ethiopia via Argentina, Australia and Arizona. Wefollow this birding odyssey as they rachet up the species and thestamps in their passports, sharing in amazing birding experiences suchas monkey-hunting Harpy Eagles in the Brazilian rain forest, seedsnipesin the Peruvian highlands and lekking bustards in South Africa, allleading to the ultimate question - will they break the magic 4,000?Written in an accessible style, this book will be of great interest tobirders, readers of travel literature, and to people who simply enjoy agood adventure!...

Title : The Biggest Twitch: Around the World in 4,000 birds
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781408123874
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 320 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Biggest Twitch: Around the World in 4,000 birds Reviews

  • Jason Paulios
    2018-11-13 18:13

    My guilty pleasure read is usually a detailed birding adventure story. I followed this couple's blog as they tried to break the world record for most birds seen in a year and was excited to see the final summation. Ended up being a big 'meh'. There was no tension in this story, their race was to beat an old record and it never felt like they weren't going to succeed. I never got the feeling like they might give up due to mental exhaustion or whatnot. May have been more interesting if there was another group doing this at the same time. Also the list of birds is so immense and diverse that following along with the bird details requires way too many field guides or stops to look up things on the internet so I was much less invested in what they were looking at. They also kept reminding us that they were obligated to write this up as a book afterward and it made me feel like they forced much of the story. Finally, Alan just seemed a little smug and mean spirited at times, though maybe his humor doesn't come across in his writing as well.

  • Anne
    2018-11-09 21:53

    Pied Water-Tyrant, Bright-Rumped Attila, Sulphur-Breasted Bushshrike, Frilled Coquette, White-tipped Plantcutter,Tawny Tit-Spinetail, Striped Woodhaunter….What do these evocative and beautiful names have in common? They belong to just a handful of the birds seen by Alan Davies and Ruth Miller in 2008, along with literally thousands more…This book is a must for anyone who is interested in birds – the tale of Alan and Ruth’s adventure across the globe in their attempt to break the world record for the number of species seen in a single year – and it is a beautifully written account, not just of the birds but the people and places that they encountered along the way.Ecuador, Panama, Texas, Cyprus, Finland, Ghana, Ethiopia, Brazil, and of course North Wales (among other places) feature in their enviable itinerary of birding, and each location is brought to life by the authors, along with the food, accommodation, local characters and, naturally, the stunning list of birds. This is just as much a travel guide as a birding book, and it captures the flavour of each location extremely well – I now have a wish-list of places that I would love to visit too! (And one or two that I definitely don’t!)Alan and Ruth take turns in writing chapters of the book, and they have quite different writing styles – I found this approach refreshing and interesting. Some of their adventures are truly hair-raising (such as the bush fire escape) or hilarious (such as the Brazilian taxi driver desperate to teach Ruth Portuguese), and throughout the book they are generous in their praise for the fellow birders and locals who helped them in their mission. The attempt on the world record keeps the momentum going, and the reader cannot help but get swept along with the atmosphere. When the world-record breaking bird is spotted, you want to cheer along with them – and still there is more to see…There are colour photos of some of the gorgeous birds at many of the locations (but I wish there were more – I envisage a big coffee-table version of the book with lavish photos on every page!) and a foreword by Kenn Kaufmann, a legend in the birding fraternity.Chestnut-Bellied Helmetshrike, Black-and-white Tody-Tyrant, Lammergeier, Stub-Tailed Antbird, Golden-Billed Saltator…. sigh….4 Stars - not 5, only because I want more photos!

  • Robin
    2018-10-28 23:19

    While I am not a bird watcher, I have enjoyed reading four books about those who are, this being the latest in that genre. I am fascinated by the sport and the dedication of those who do bird watch. I am amazed at the lengths people will go to to see them,and the logistics and resources it takes to do so. Alan and Ruth undertook an interesting and in many ways unpredictable journey to see if they could break the world record for the number of birds seen in a calendar year, and they were successful beyond their imagination. The book they wrote to describe that journey is well-written and also interesting.

  • Spurnlad
    2018-10-28 00:13

    Birding around the world while name-dropping; leeching off contacts and letting everyone know how well-loved and fabulous they are.The worst birding book I have ever read. If you want to read a good one, look at The Big Twitch by Sean Dooley, or Kingbird Highway by Kenn Kaufmann.