Read Lowcountry Hurricanes: Three Centuries of Storms at Sea and Ashore by Walter J. Fraser Jr. Walter J. Fraser Online

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At once sobering and thrilling, this illustrated history recounts how, for the past three hundred years, hurricanes have altered lives and landscapes along the Georgia-South Carolina seaboard. A prime target for the fierce storms that develop in the Atlantic, the region is especially vulnerable because of its shallow, gradually sloping sea floor and low-lying coastline.WitAt once sobering and thrilling, this illustrated history recounts how, for the past three hundred years, hurricanes have altered lives and landscapes along the Georgia-South Carolina seaboard. A prime target for the fierce storms that develop in the Atlantic, the region is especially vulnerable because of its shallow, gradually sloping sea floor and low-lying coastline.With an eye on both natural and built environments, Fraser's narrative ranges from the first documented storm in 1686 to recent times in describing how the lowcountry has endured some of the severest effects of wind and water. This chronology of the most notable lowcountry storms is also a useful primer on the basics of hurricane dynamics.Fraser tells how the 800-ton Rising Sun foundered in open water near Charles Town during the hurricane of 1700. About one hundred persons were aboard. All perished. Drawing on eyewitness accounts, he describes the storm surge of an 1804 hurricane that submerged most of Tybee Island and swept over the fort on nearby Cockspur Island, drowning soldiers and civilians. Readers may have their own memories of Hurricanes Andrew, Opal, and Hugo. Although hurricanes frequently lead to significant loss of life, Fraser recounts numerous gripping instances of survival and rescue at sea and ashore.The author smoothly weaves the lowcountry's long social, political, and economic history with firsthand reports and data accumulated by the National Weather Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Generously illustrated with contemporary and historical photographs, this is a readable and informative resource on one of nature's most awesome forces....

Title : Lowcountry Hurricanes: Three Centuries of Storms at Sea and Ashore
Author :
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ISBN : 9780820328669
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 368 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Lowcountry Hurricanes: Three Centuries of Storms at Sea and Ashore Reviews

  • MeriBeth
    2018-12-03 07:23

    I borrowed this book from my local library for research related to a writing project I am attempting. There is very little easily accessible information for hurricanes outside of those which strike Florida or Louisiana making this book an invaluable resource. Its narrow focus, only on hurricanes and their effects, keeps it from straying into other details like society and culture of the area. Written in chronological order, it covers all the major tropical storms and hurricanes which hit the Carolina and Georgia coastal region, commonly called The Lowcountry, between the years 1686 and 2004. Each storm gets a brief write up describing the type of storm, where it tracked and what kind of damage it caused. The earliest storms have the briefest mentions, later storms are more detailed. The one drawback of the book is the tangled way in which some storms are described, especially when dealing with descriptions of the damage to seagoing vessels, as often times Mr. Fraser will talk about more than one storm at the same time. You have to refer back to a subsection’s title to figure out which storm he’s discussing or reread the previous page to keep track. Still, as a source of detailed information about these hurricanes, this is an excellent resource. I highly recommend it for the information on the early coastal storms alone.Crossposted to my book blog here.

  • Ceh131973
    2018-12-10 13:28

    Reading this book was like reading a shopping list. Except a shopping list may be more interesting. This book had lots of information but no narrative aspect. I think the author bit off more than he could chew covering such a large span of time.